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Search results for 'out':

out adverb 1 away from the inside; not in or at a place • Go out into the garden. 2 not in one's home or place of work • I called but you were out. 3 to or at an end; to or into a state of being completely finished, exhausted or extinct, etc • The milk has run outbefore the day is outPut the candle out. 4 aloud • cry out. 5 with care or taking care • Listen out for the babywatch out. 6 in all directions from a central point • Share out the sweets. 7 to the fullest extent or amount • Spread the blanket out. 8 to public attention or notice; revealed • The secret is out. 9 sport said of a person batting: no longer able to bat, eg because of having the ball caught by an opponent • bowled out. 10 in or into a state of being removed, omitted or forgotten • miss him outRub out the mistake. 11 not to be considered; rejected • That idea's out. 12 removed; dislocated • have a tooth out. 13 not in authority; not having political power • voted them out of office. 14 into unconsciousness • pass out in the heat. 15 in error • Your total is out by three. 16 colloq existing • the best car out. 17 said of a flower: in bloom. 18 said of a book: published • will be out in the autumn. 19 visible • the moon's out. 20 no longer in fashion • Drainpipes are out, flares are in. 21 said of workers: on strike • called the miners out. 22 said of a jury: considering its verdict. 23 old use said of a young woman: introduced into fashionable society. 24 said of a tide: at or towards the lowest level of water • going out. adj 1 external. 2 directing or showing direction outwards. prep, colloq, especially US out of something • Get out the car. exclamation expressing: 1 sport that the batsman is dismissed. 2 that a radio transmission has finished • over and out. noun a way out, a way of escape; an excuse. verb (outed, outing) 1 intrans to become publicly known • Murder will out. 2 to make public the homosexuality of (a famous person who has been attempting to keep their homosexuality secret). Compare come out (sense 10) at come. be out for something colloq to be determined to achieve it • He's just out for revenge. out and about active outside the house, especially after an illness. out and away by far; much. out of something 1 from inside it • drive out of the garage. 2 not in or within it • be out of the house. 3 having exhausted a supply of it • be out of butter. 4 from among several • two out of three cats. 5 from a material • made out of wood. 6 because of it • out of anger. 7 beyond the range, scope or bounds of it • out of reachout of the ordinary. 8 excluded from it • leave him out of the team. 9 no longer in a stated condition • out of practice. 10 at a stated distance from a place • a mile out of town. 11 without or so as to be without something • cheat him out of his money. out of date old-fashioned and no longer of use; obsolete. out of it 1 colloq not part of, or wanted in, a group or activity, etc. 2 slang unable to behave normally or control oneself, usually because of drink or drugs. out of pocket having spent more money than one can afford. out of the way 1 difficult to reach or arrive at. 2 unusual; uncommon. ins and outs see ins and outs at in. out to lunch slang said of a person: slightly crazy; in a dream world. out with it! an exhortation to speak openly.
ETYMOLOGY: Anglo-Saxon ut.

out adverb 1 away from the inside; not in or at a place • Go out into the garden. 2 not in one's home or place of work • I called but you were out. 3 to or at an end; to or into a state of being completely finished, exhausted or extinct, etc • The milk has run outbefore the day is outPut the candle out. 4 aloud • cry out. 5 with care or taking care • Listen out for the babywatch out. 6 in all directions from a central point • Share out the sweets. 7 to the fullest extent or amount • Spread the blanket out. 8 to public attention or notice; revealed • The secret is out. 9 sport said of a person batting: no longer able to bat, eg because of having the ball caught by an opponent • bowled out. 10 in or into a state of being removed, omitted or forgotten • miss him outRub out the mistake. 11 not to be considered; rejected • That idea's out. 12 removed; dislocated • have a tooth out. 13 not in authority; not having political power • voted them out of office. 14 into unconsciousness • pass out in the heat. 15 in error • Your total is out by three. 16 colloq existing • the best car out. 17 said of a flower: in bloom. 18 said of a book: published • will be out in the autumn. 19 visible • the moon's out. 20 no longer in fashion • Drainpipes are out, flares are in. 21 said of workers: on strike • called the miners out. 22 said of a jury: considering its verdict. 23 old use said of a young woman: introduced into fashionable society. 24 said of a tide: at or towards the lowest level of water • going out. adj 1 external. 2 directing or showing direction outwards. prep, colloq, especially US out of something • Get out the car. exclamation expressing: 1 sport that the batsman is dismissed. 2 that a radio transmission has finished • over and out. noun a way out, a way of escape; an excuse. verb (outed, outing) 1 intrans to become publicly known • Murder will out. 2 to make public the homosexuality of (a famous person who has been attempting to keep their homosexuality secret). Compare come out (sense 10) at come. be out for something colloq to be determined to achieve it • He's just out for revenge. out and about active outside the house, especially after an illness. out and away by far; much. out of something 1 from inside it • drive out of the garage. 2 not in or within it • be out of the house. 3 having exhausted a supply of it • be out of butter. 4 from among several • two out of three cats. 5 from a material • made out of wood. 6 because of it • out of anger. 7 beyond the range, scope or bounds of it • out of reachout of the ordinary. 8 excluded from it • leave him out of the team. 9 no longer in a stated condition • out of practice. 10 at a stated distance from a place • a mile out of town. 11 without or so as to be without something • cheat him out of his money. out of date old-fashioned and no longer of use; obsolete. out of it 1 colloq not part of, or wanted in, a group or activity, etc. 2 slang unable to behave normally or control oneself, usually because of drink or drugs. out of pocket having spent more money than one can afford. out of the way 1 difficult to reach or arrive at. 2 unusual; uncommon. ins and outs see ins and outs at in. out to lunch slang said of a person: slightly crazy; in a dream world. out with it! an exhortation to speak openly.
ETYMOLOGY: Anglo-Saxon ut.

out adverb 1 away from the inside; not in or at a place • Go out into the garden. 2 not in one's home or place of work • I called but you were out. 3 to or at an end; to or into a state of being completely finished, exhausted or extinct, etc • The milk has run outbefore the day is outPut the candle out. 4 aloud • cry out. 5 with care or taking care • Listen out for the babywatch out. 6 in all directions from a central point • Share out the sweets. 7 to the fullest extent or amount • Spread the blanket out. 8 to public attention or notice; revealed • The secret is out. 9 sport said of a person batting: no longer able to bat, eg because of having the ball caught by an opponent • bowled out. 10 in or into a state of being removed, omitted or forgotten • miss him outRub out the mistake. 11 not to be considered; rejected • That idea's out. 12 removed; dislocated • have a tooth out. 13 not in authority; not having political power • voted them out of office. 14 into unconsciousness • pass out in the heat. 15 in error • Your total is out by three. 16 colloq existing • the best car out. 17 said of a flower: in bloom. 18 said of a book: published • will be out in the autumn. 19 visible • the moon's out. 20 no longer in fashion • Drainpipes are out, flares are in. 21 said of workers: on strike • called the miners out. 22 said of a jury: considering its verdict. 23 old use said of a young woman: introduced into fashionable society. 24 said of a tide: at or towards the lowest level of water • going out. adj 1 external. 2 directing or showing direction outwards. prep, colloq, especially US out of something • Get out the car. exclamation expressing: 1 sport that the batsman is dismissed. 2 that a radio transmission has finished • over and out. noun a way out, a way of escape; an excuse. verb (outed, outing) 1 intrans to become publicly known • Murder will out. 2 to make public the homosexuality of (a famous person who has been attempting to keep their homosexuality secret). Compare come out (sense 10) at come. be out for something colloq to be determined to achieve it • He's just out for revenge. out and about active outside the house, especially after an illness. out and away by far; much. out of something 1 from inside it • drive out of the garage. 2 not in or within it • be out of the house. 3 having exhausted a supply of it • be out of butter. 4 from among several • two out of three cats. 5 from a material • made out of wood. 6 because of it • out of anger. 7 beyond the range, scope or bounds of it • out of reachout of the ordinary. 8 excluded from it • leave him out of the team. 9 no longer in a stated condition • out of practice. 10 at a stated distance from a place • a mile out of town. 11 without or so as to be without something • cheat him out of his money. out of date old-fashioned and no longer of use; obsolete. out of it 1 colloq not part of, or wanted in, a group or activity, etc. 2 slang unable to behave normally or control oneself, usually because of drink or drugs. out of pocket having spent more money than one can afford. out of the way 1 difficult to reach or arrive at. 2 unusual; uncommon. ins and outs see ins and outs at in. out to lunch slang said of a person: slightly crazy; in a dream world. out with it! an exhortation to speak openly.
ETYMOLOGY: Anglo-Saxon ut.